Ending more than a month-long stand-off with Chinese troops near a three-way junction between Bhutan, China and India, the Indian Foreign Ministry on Monday said the two neighbours have begun to swiftly withdraw border forces from the disputed Donglang/Doklam area.

“In recent weeks, India and China have maintained diplomatic communication in respect of the incident at Doklam. On this basis expeditious disengagement of border personnel at the face-off site in Doklam has been agreed and is on-going,” an Indian Foreign Ministry statement said.

Beijing has responded to the statement confirming the withdrawal of Indian troops from the disputed zone.

Indian forces have already withdrawn to the Indian side of border, the Chinese Foreign Ministry said within minutes of the Indian government’s press briefing.

The recent stalemate involved over 200 soldiers each from the Chinese People’s Liberation Army and the Indian Army standing just 100 meters (328 feet) apart at Donglang/Doklam, a plateau at the tri-junction where the borders of India, China and Bhutan meet.

Earlier in June, Indian Army troops stopped a road construction by the Chinese PLA, crossing over into Donglang, which is claimed by Beijing as Chinese territory.

At a meeting between the local army commanders from India and China at Nathu La in Sikkim on August 11, China insisted on the withdrawal of Indian Army troops from the disputed region.

The Indian statement of withdrawal of troops comes ahead of the Indian Prime Minister’s upcoming visit to China for the 9th BRICS annual Summit.

Official relations between the world’s two fastest growing economies have come a long way since the two fought a brief border war in 1962.

India has partnered with China on both the BRICS Bank and the AIIB.